Nov 28, 2013

Katrin’s Chronicles: The Canon of Jacquelene Dyanne, Vol. 1

Title: Katrin’s Chronicles: The Canon of Jacquelene Dyanne, Vol. 1
Author: Valerie C. Woods
Genre: Psychic Girl Detectives, Middle Grade

On the verge of entering high school, precociously eloquent 13 -year-old Katrin DuBois feels it’s never too soon to start an autobiography. She decides to set the record straight about the outrageous rumors concerning certain adventures that began when she was in sixth grade. That’s when her elder sister, 8th grader J. Dyanne, began exhibiting extraordinary detecting skills, and emerging psychic abilities.
Set during the latter half of 1968, these African-American tweens live in a working class neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. They manage to thrive in a world of social change with multi-generational family support, creative quick-thinking and fearless inquisitiveness. The dog days of August find them prohibited by their parents from visiting the Central Library downtown because of the riots during the Democratic Convention. However, there’s plenty of adventure in their own neighborhood as they become swept up in family mysteries, neighborhood political schemes and the discovery of a surprising legacy of psychic, even supernatural, talent.
Katrin’s Chronicles: The Canon of Jacqueléne Dyanne, expands the girl detective genre to include these smart, sister sleuths.
Author Bio
An avid reader while growing up on Chicago’s South Side, Ms. Woods began writing when, as a struggling actress in New York, she couldn’t find suitable audition material for women of color. This led her to write a book of audition monologues, Something for Everyone (50 Original Monologues). The book was initially self-published and is now published by renowned theatrical play publisher, Samuel French, Inc. (www.VCWoods.com)
After adapting an average play into a better screenplay, Ms. Woods was awarded a Walt Disney Screenwriting Fellowship and followed that up with writing and producing on network and cable drama series such as Under One Roof, Touched By An Angel, Promised Land, Any Day Now and Soul Food.
But fiction, her first love, compelled her to enter the world of prose. She had always written bits of fiction, short stories and a little poetry here and there.
In November 2012, Ms. Woods founded a micro -press: BooksEndependent, LLC (www.BooksEndependent .com) to support her work and the work of other new, independent authors of fiction and non-fiction.
The first title was Ms. Woods’ novella, I Believe ... A Ghost Story for the Holidays . (Amazon.com) Then, what began as a gift became her second publication.
Several years ago, needing a birthday present for her sister Ms. Woods wrote a short story about a girl detective -- a highly fictionalized autobiography of the adventures she and her sister experienced in childhood. Another story was written for Christmas, then one for Mother's Day. That’s when Ms. Woods realized she was writing the kind of novel she and her sister would have loved to read as children, but which didn’t exist – the adventures of African-American Girl Detectives!
The result, Katrin's Chronicles: The Canon of Jacqueléne Dyanne, Vol. 1 is now available in paperback and Kindle edition at Amazon.com.
Book excerpts
Book Excerpt #1
Many people still believe that it was J. Dyanne who, in March 1968, prophesized the accident that resulted in the broken leg of one Derek Fremont, the then thirteen-year-old delinquent who lives three houses down. But what do you expect will happen when you ride backwards on the handlebars of a handmade, motorized bicycle? Even I could have predicted the result and I only possess the vision afforded by the glasses I have been forced to wear since the 4th grade.
Granted, the specificity with which J. Dyanne was able to identify the location, number and severity of the fractured bones, as well as the fact that it was indeed his right leg and not the left that was put in a cast, may have fueled the rumors of prophecy. But really, she’s just very observant.
But at the time, people were prone to believe anything.
It was Chicago, August 1968, a time of extraordinary things, when the unbelievable turned out to be very believable after all. Therefore, I will, through these official chronicles, do my humble best to clarify the chaos and set the record straight. If I don’t, who will?
As Grand Anne says, “If you don’t write your own history, someone else will make it up for you.”
Although there are many instances of J. Dyanne’s intellect and expanded awareness recounted among family and close friends, my goal here is to formally archive with as much accuracy as memory will allow, the true canon of Jacqueléne Dyanne — her life and work. So far.
I will return to the beginning. A time when I was a regular sixth grader, innocent of what I now know was a turning point. It all began on a fairly ordinary day on the South Side of Chicago in a neighborhood of modest homes and two-story apartment buildings, on tree-lined streets and fenced backyards. That day culminated in the first of a series of events to which the local press gave the fanciful title of “The Strange Case of the South Side Seer.”
Nonsense, of course, but the media does like a fantastic story to feed the frenzy.
* * * * *
Book Excerpt #2
“The dreams,” J. Dyanne said. “You know, they’re real.” “Well, of course they’re real. Dreams are normal.”
“Katrin…” she said, looking up at me. “They’re true. My dreams are true. That’s not normal. I was hoping it was just a phase or something. But Aunt Alis says it’s a talent.”
“You talked to Aunt Alis? When? Where was I?” “You were sleep. And… well, so was I.”
Okay, so I admit, this was getting kinda strange. J. Dyanne having conversations with people in her dreams. And they were real.
“So, what else haven’t you told me?” I said.
“Well, sometimes it happens when I’m not asleep, like that thing with Derek Fremont. I


saw it all the minute he rolled out that stupid bike. But would he listen? No. Nobody ever listens.”
“Reverend Ingle listened.”
“Only because Mom convinced him,” she insisted. She tossed aside her sketchpad in frustration and began pacing. “Katrin, I know this stuff and I really don’t want to know it, so I try to ignore it, but if I don’t say anything, I get nagged about it, actual nagging in my head, like it’s some kind of obligation I have to fulfill. But then people don’t want to hear it, or they get scared and start calling me names and it’s just a waste of time mostly and I was hoping if I just stayed away from people it would go away, but it looks like that’s not going to happen, so I’m stuck!”
She stopped pacing, snatched up her sketchpad and began to make furious strokes with her graphite pencil. I watched her for a moment, head down in case she couldn’t hold back the frustrated tears I caught surging in her eyes. This was definitely a new side of Jacqueléne. I wanted to offer something that would help her feel better, but the truth is, what was unfolding was just a bit scary. So, naturally, I lied.
“I’m not scared.” I picked up my Merlin book. “You can tell me anything.” The only response was a sniff. “In fact, there’s something you can help with.” J. Dyanne looked up.
“Will the Cubs win the pennant this year?”
She then did what I hoped she’d do. J. Dyanne laughed — a good, long, loud laugh.
“No one can know that. Not even me,” she replied, still chuckling. And suddenly, the muggy, heavy summer air felt lighter.
Jacqueléne Dyanne Dubois. She may not know everything, but as I learned in the months and years ahead, she knew a sight more than most.
* * * * *
Book Excerpt #3
During the course of the evening, J. Dyanne and I sat down with Grand Anne and Great Aunt Alis.
“Well?” said Alis. J. Dyanne squirmed a bit.
“Use it or lose it,” said Grand Anne. “It’s your choice.” J. Dyanne still did not respond. Grand Anne went on.
“You aren’t in this alone.” A soft smile crossed her face. She turned to Aunt Alis. “Remember Mama Susie? She was a taskmaster she was.” Alis nodded.
“She was that. And I thank her every day. Saved my life more than once.” Alis took J. Dyanne’s hand.
“Your talent has a long tradition, girly. I don’t know the end, but I do know it has a purpose. You can take it to the next generation.”
“And you can also let it go,” Grand Anne said. “As you say, you’ve got other talents. And they are useful and you’ll probably have a fine life.”
“But?” J. Dyanne asked.
“But nothing,” said Alis. “What needs to happen will happen with or without you. It’ll just take a little longer, maybe.” I couldn’t stand it.
“What needs to happen? What are you talking about?”




Grand Anne gave a deep sigh. I recognized it as a trait often seen in J. Dyanne. It had something to do with a kind of acceptance of the inevitable.
“You have been born to a purpose. The task is to discover this purpose and bring it forward into the world. You are at the time of life where you begin your discovery.”
“You make it sound like I’m some kind of ‘chosen one’ or something.” Alis and Grand Anne exchanged looks and smiled.
“Of course you are, Jacqueléne,” Grand Anne responded. J. Dyanne sat frozen in her chair. “You can’t be serious.”
“Oh yes. But the question you need to ask is: for what have you been chosen?” Alis picked up the thread.
“Despite the myths and legends we read about, there has never been just a single ‘chosen one’ because we are each chosen for a purpose. No person is born without one. Maybe you’ve been chosen to be a leader. Maybe you’ve been chosen to be a healer. You are the only one who can discover what you have been born to do.”
“And so, again the question to you, Jacqueléne Dyanne DuBois, is: Well?”
J. Dyanne got that watchful, wistful look on her face that betokened an advanced state of concentration. I was beginning to know it well. And then she too gave a deep sigh. I knew then that she was ready to accept all of her talents, not just the logical ones but the intuitive and intangible ones as well.
Nothing more was said. Words were no longer needed. Not with this group. Even I could sense that we had moved to a new place of adventure and discovery.
I could hardly wait.